Disgusterous

Author Topic: Walking the dog  (Read 5808 times)

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Offline Snoopy

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Re: Walking the dog
« Reply #30 on: March 06, 2011, 09:27:24 AM »
http://www.phoenixdogrescue.co.uk/rehoming/dog6.php

He plans to ditch the girly name and call her WUlfy  ::)

He won't be able to use its name when shouting 'stop' while it tears his face off anyway.



My immediate thought DS .... some people will never learn. noooo:
I used to have a handle on life but it broke.

Offline Pastis

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Re: Walking the dog
« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2011, 05:02:19 PM »
I have a chum whose dog Boz excels at catching the frisbee. I don't know how this skill was first learnt but it's quite a spectacle  razz:

Boz (look-a-like), not the Frisbee obviously


Like the Buddhist said to the hot dog vendor...
"Make me one with everything"

Offline Miss Creant Commander of the picklement and baking BAb(Hons)

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Re: Walking the dog
« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2011, 06:35:34 PM »
I have a chum whose dog Boz excels at catching the frisbee. I don't know how this skill was first learnt but it's quite a spectacle  razz:

Boz (look-a-like), not the Frisbee obviously




Boz looks like a sight hound Pastis. Sight hounds include greyhound whippets and lurchers amongst others.  Info from Wikipedia below.

These dogs specialize in pursuing prey, keeping it in sight, and overpowering it by their great speed and agility. They must be able to quickly detect motion, so they have keen vision. Sighthounds must be able to capture fast, agile prey such as deer and hare, so they have a very flexible back and long legs for a long stride, a deep chest to support an unusually (compared to other dogs) large heart, very efficient lungs for both anaerobic and aerobic sprints, and a lean, wiry body to keep their weight at a minimum.

I have always thought that the worst thing about drowning was having to call 'help!' You must look such a fool. It's put me against drowning.
J Basil Boothroyd

Offline Snoopy

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Re: Walking the dog
« Reply #33 on: March 08, 2011, 07:37:12 AM »
I used to have one of these. Very large, very fast and could run for miles. Apparently, so the breeder told me, they were first bred to hunt lions ..... they simply ran the lions into the ground. Top Tip: If ever you own one they are virtually untrainable until they are about 7 years of age. They can be taught the basics of sit, etc but if you let the buggers off the leash be prepared for at least a ten mile walk to get it back. I eventually managed to train mine to "SIT" on command but he never would come back if called. He would just sit and wait for me to catch up. After a few years of this I also got a border collie/lab first cross and she would "round him up" ... she would also round up the kids on command.


His name was "Sinbad" although his kennel name was "Prince Sinbad of........" etc. Far better pedigree than his owner.  redface:

I discovered a dog track (licenced) near where we lived that once a month ran an "Afghan" race night.
B@st@rd dogs were a law unto themselves. Unlike Greyhounds the Afghans would stop for a pee halfway through a race, if they sighted the lure on the far side of the track they were bright enough to turn and catch it when it caught up with them. I have even seen the sods mating halfway through a race but we all said the owner of the bitch should have not bought her racing when in heat as we reckoned he was hoping to get puppies for free and normal mating fees could run into £thousands!
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 07:42:12 AM by Snoopy »
I used to have a handle on life but it broke.