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Author Topic: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures  (Read 62364 times)

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Offline Steve

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #600 on: January 26, 2019, 03:20:37 PM »
A closer look:


:thumbsup: 

just weird shape and markings that

and how come they can take better pictures of that at umpteen trillion miles away than I could of the moon eclipse?
Well, whatever nevermind

Offline Uncle Mort

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #601 on: January 26, 2019, 04:31:15 PM »
Looks like a number of smaller lumps have coalesced to form one bigger body.

Offline Steve

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #602 on: January 26, 2019, 05:19:59 PM »
Looks like a number of smaller lumps have coalesced to form one bigger body.
Cosmic PlayDo?
Well, whatever nevermind

Offline Uncle Mort

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #603 on: January 30, 2019, 02:10:21 PM »


A Pan-STARRS all-sky image showing 800 million discrete sources.  eeek:

Offline Barman

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #604 on: January 30, 2019, 02:20:07 PM »


A Pan-STARRS all-sky image showing 800 million discrete sources.  eeek:

 eeek:

What does that mean like...?  redface:
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Offline Steve

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #605 on: January 30, 2019, 03:15:35 PM »


A Pan-STARRS all-sky image showing 800 million discrete sources.  eeek:

 eeek:

What does that mean like...?  redface:
well that makes me  redface: too as I'm  Shrugs:  too

Well, whatever nevermind

Offline Steve

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #606 on: January 30, 2019, 03:19:40 PM »
The interweb says it's:  "30,000 times the total content of Wikipedia " 

most of the rest of it looked like something a true procrastinator would try to understand tomorrow - or maybe Friday (and next week beckons)

https://astronomynow.com/2019/01/28/a-whopping-1-6-petabytes-of-pan-starrs-data-now-available/
Well, whatever nevermind

Offline Nick

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #607 on: June 25, 2019, 06:25:59 AM »
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Offline Barman

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Offline Steve

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Offline Darwins Selection

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #610 on: June 25, 2019, 12:40:02 PM »
I mostly despair

Offline Nick

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #611 on: June 25, 2019, 12:41:36 PM »
Philistines  noooo:
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Offline Steve

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #612 on: June 25, 2019, 12:44:35 PM »
Philistines  noooo:
You say that like it's a bad thing  rubschin:
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Offline Nick

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #613 on: June 25, 2019, 12:54:30 PM »
This will make it clear

The same desire for clearness, which has led me thus to extend a little my first analysis of the three great classes of English society, prompts me also to make my nomenclature for them a little fuller, with a view to making it thereby more clear and manageable. It is awkward and tiresome to be always saying the aristocratic class, the middle-class, the working-class. For the middle-class, for that great body which, as we know, "has done all the great things that have been done in all departments," and which is to be conceived as chiefly moving between its two cardinal points of Mr. Bazley and the Rev. W. Cattle, but inclining, in the mass, rather towards the latter than the former for this class we have a designation which now has become pretty well known, and which we may as well still keep for them, the designation of Philistines. What this term means I have so often explained that I need not repeat it here. For the aristocratic class, conceived mainly as a body moving between the two cardinal points of Lord Elcho and Sir Thomas Bateson, but as a whole nearer to the latter than the former, we have as yet got no special designation. Almost [97/98] all my attention has naturally been concentrated on my own class, the middle-class, with which I am in closest sympathy, and which has been, besides, the great power of our day, and has had its praises sung by all speakers and newspapers. Still the aristocratic class is so important in itself, and the weighty functions which Mr. Carlyle proposes at the present critical time to commit to it must add so much to its importance, that it seems neglectful, and a strong instance of that want of coherent philosophic method for which Mr. Frederic Harrison blames me, to leave the aristocratic class so much without notice and denomination. It may be thought that the characteristic which I have occasionally mentioned as proper to aristocracies, their natural inaccessibility, as children of the established fact, to ideas, points to our extending to this class also the designation of Philistines; the Philistine being, as is well known, the enemy of the children of light, or servants of the idea. Nevertheless, there seems to be an inconvenience in thus giving one and the same designation to two very different classes; and besides, if we look into the thing closely, we shall find that the term Philistine conveys a sense which [98/99] makes it more peculiarly appropriate to our middle class than to our aristocratic. For Philistine gives the notion of something particularly stiff-necked and perverse in the resistance to light and its children, and therein it specially suits our middle-class, who not only do not pursue sweetness and light, but who prefer to them that sort of machinery of business, chapels, tea meetings, and addresses from Mr. Murphy and the Rev. W. Cattle, which makes up the dismal and illiberal life on which I have so often touched. But the aristocratic class has actually, as we have seen, in its well-known politeness, a kind of image or shadow of sweetness; and as for light, if it does not pursue light, it is not that it perversely cherishes some dismal and illiberal existence in preference to light, but it is seduced from following light by those mighty and eternal seducers of our race which weave for this class their most irresistible charms, by worldly splendour, security, power and pleasure. These seducers are exterior goods, but they are goods; and he who is hindered by them from caring for light and ideas, is not so much doing what is perverse as what is natural.



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Offline Barman

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Re: Uncle Mort's Space Pictures
« Reply #614 on: June 25, 2019, 12:59:32 PM »
This will make it clear

The same desire for clearness, which has led me thus to extend a little my first analysis of the three great classes of English society, prompts me also to make my nomenclature for them a little fuller, with a view to making it thereby more clear and manageable. It is awkward and tiresome to be always saying the aristocratic class, the middle-class, the working-class. For the middle-class, for that great body which, as we know, "has done all the great things that have been done in all departments," and which is to be conceived as chiefly moving between its two cardinal points of Mr. Bazley and the Rev. W. Cattle, but inclining, in the mass, rather towards the latter than the former for this class we have a designation which now has become pretty well known, and which we may as well still keep for them, the designation of Philistines. What this term means I have so often explained that I need not repeat it here. For the aristocratic class, conceived mainly as a body moving between the two cardinal points of Lord Elcho and Sir Thomas Bateson, but as a whole nearer to the latter than the former, we have as yet got no special designation. Almost [97/98] all my attention has naturally been concentrated on my own class, the middle-class, with which I am in closest sympathy, and which has been, besides, the great power of our day, and has had its praises sung by all speakers and newspapers. Still the aristocratic class is so important in itself, and the weighty functions which Mr. Carlyle proposes at the present critical time to commit to it must add so much to its importance, that it seems neglectful, and a strong instance of that want of coherent philosophic method for which Mr. Frederic Harrison blames me, to leave the aristocratic class so much without notice and denomination. It may be thought that the characteristic which I have occasionally mentioned as proper to aristocracies, their natural inaccessibility, as children of the established fact, to ideas, points to our extending to this class also the designation of Philistines; the Philistine being, as is well known, the enemy of the children of light, or servants of the idea. Nevertheless, there seems to be an inconvenience in thus giving one and the same designation to two very different classes; and besides, if we look into the thing closely, we shall find that the term Philistine conveys a sense which [98/99] makes it more peculiarly appropriate to our middle class than to our aristocratic. For Philistine gives the notion of something particularly stiff-necked and perverse in the resistance to light and its children, and therein it specially suits our middle-class, who not only do not pursue sweetness and light, but who prefer to them that sort of machinery of business, chapels, tea meetings, and addresses from Mr. Murphy and the Rev. W. Cattle, which makes up the dismal and illiberal life on which I have so often touched. But the aristocratic class has actually, as we have seen, in its well-known politeness, a kind of image or shadow of sweetness; and as for light, if it does not pursue light, it is not that it perversely cherishes some dismal and illiberal existence in preference to light, but it is seduced from following light by those mighty and eternal seducers of our race which weave for this class their most irresistible charms, by worldly splendour, security, power and pleasure. These seducers are exterior goods, but they are goods; and he who is hindered by them from caring for light and ideas, is not so much doing what is perverse as what is natural.

Tl:dr  noooo:
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